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    “Television De Andalusia”Came to costa Rica Looking for Spaniards Living in Guanacaste and Southern Caribbean

    Getting to know the innumerable beauties, traditions and customs of both coastal areas

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    Andalusian television, Canal Sur, sent two production teams to Costa Rica as part of its program Andalucía X El Mundo.On this occasion, the teams had the mission of meeting several Spaniards who decided to leave their lives in the southern lands of Spain to start a new one in Guanacaste and the southern Caribbean.

    And not only to know their motivations for having settled in our country. The reports showed the interaction of these Andalusians with their communities, but also the innumerable beauties, traditions and customs of both coastal areas.

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    Canal Sur is the main television station of the Andalusian Public Radio and Television Business Agency.It was created in 1989 in order to portray life in this area of ​​Spain, its historical legacy, its day-to-day life and its needs.

    Andalusia is an autonomous region made up of the provinces of Almería, Cádiz, Córdoba, Granada, Huelva, Jaén, Málaga and Seville. Its capital is Seville, seat of the Governing Council of the Junta de Andalucía and the Parliament. The headquarters of the Superior Court of Justice of Andalusia is located in Granada.

    The first to air

    The two specials – over an hour each – came out recently. The first to see the light were the Andalusians in Guanacaste, specifically those who live in and around Tamarindo.

    This special aired last October and was presented by Rocío Vicente. She assured that the area is known for the “most impressive sunsets on the planet, a true paradise for nature lovers,” she said.

    In Guanacaste she spoke with Enrique Ramírez, from Córdoba, who arrived in the country 30 years ago “fleeing from a society that is too agitated.”“I feel Tico. I am Spanish by birth but at heart I feel Costa Rican. I really love this country. I am in love with it. I am the best seller of Costa Rica”.”This country has given me everything: it has given me children, it has given me money, it has given me happiness,” said this native of Andalusia, father of two Ticos and also businessman.

    Enrique met Melissa, a Costa Rican from the Caribbean whom he married 8 years ago. She has two children with him and describes him as “charming.” This Cordovan recognized that, despite his infatuation with Costa Rica, he assures that it is one of the most expensive countries in the world.

    Other Andalusians

    Rocío spoke with Quique Campos, a native of Malaga who arrived in our country 3 years ago with his wife and little daughter.“The vast majority of people who come are attracted to surfing. This is a unique destination in the world. There are waves every day. Practically the day that there are no waves is like “hey, what’s up,” Campos said.

    Quique commented that he arrived in Costa Rica for the first time in 2006 and repeated in 2008, 2011 and 2014 until he spoke with his wife and they decided to settle in Guanacaste. He is dedicated to building smart homes.

    In the report, this native of Malaga introduces the production team to Rosa, a native of Jerez, who lives here with her brother. She stated falling in love with the country and develops constructions here and says that in terms of paperwork it is “easier here than in Spain.”

    Canal Sur also spoke with Sonia Carretero, from Huelva, who has lived in Costa Rica for 7 years with her husband.Here she is dedicated as a photographer, topographer and multimedia producer. But she also performs community support work through an NGO.She took the Andalusian channel team to try Patacones, Chimichurri and Vigorón, among other dishes.

    “It is the Andalusia of Costa Rica, because it is the most beautiful place, the place where people are more open, where the best life is lived, everything is more fun and it is the driest area,” said Elia Machado of Cordova.She arrived in the country 9 years ago “for love”, because it was her husband – who had already known Costa Rica since 2000 – who convinced her to leave everything in Spain. “But I fell in love with this place.”Here she lives with her little daughter, her partner from Melilla and together they have a diving company.

    The second report

    Days ago, the second report from Andalucía X El Mundo dedicated to Costa Rica came out, this time the southern Caribbean. Manuel Martínez spoke with various Andalusians who took root in this area of ​​our territory.

    One of them is Juan Ma Reyes, from Seville and living in Limón for 7 years. He took Manuel to see Playa Negra and told him the reason for the name of this place. In Puerto Viejo, Juan Ma runs an organic products store with his wife.The production team spoke, thanks to Juan Ma, with an indigenous Bribri who spoke about the properties of various plants.

    The host of the space also met Esmeralda, who was born in the town of Vejer de la Frontera. She sold her belongings there and decided to move to Puerto Viejo to teach flamenco.

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