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    Trek on the Sendero de los Reyes, the Sacred Hill of the Bribri and Cabécar Indigenous People

    Experiencing the magic of Costa Rica

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    In a full-day tour into Tico indigenous territory, hikers will be able to visit the “Sendero de los Reyes” (Path of Kings), a walk that takes place behind the Cerro del Tigre, a sacred hill for the native Bribri culture.

    “These trails were used by our ancestors for more than 5,000 years. The “Sendero de los Reyes” is the Chinese Wall for the Bribri and Cabécar culture. It is an incredible engineering, dividing the Bribri and Cabécar territory. From there you can see the Cerro Kamuk, the seas and the sacred land. If this trail is completed, it will go to Cartago,” said Roger Blanco, a Bribri indigenous and tour guide.

    This is a one day tour, which takes around four hours. During the tour you will be able to observe different types of waterfalls. “The waterfalls in the Bribri territory are different from those on the Cabécar side, and this is closely linked to our history. The waterfalls on the side of the Lari River are steep, as if on a slope, while those on the Bribri side are falling,” said Blanco.

    Sacred native lands


    In this forest live spiritual beings, who are guardians of the forest that are observed through nature. To enter you must maintain respect and follow the rules of the “baqueanos” (natives). Shouting is not allowed and tourists must adhere to the spiritual recommendations, for example, carry a little “annatto” (token) in the right pocket, which are recommendations of the wise elders, this in order to be well received in the jungle.

    “If a person sees something while we are walking, we should not mention it, just take a note and then, at the end of the night, talk about it, otherwise it can get you out of concentration and this complicates the “baqueano” and in the jungle one can easily get lost if you move a meter away, because the jungle is another energy and another force”, he added.
    This tour can be done with the Koswak Usure agency, a group of indigenous Bribri who decided to show a bit of their culture, the natural beauties of Talamanca, always with respect for traditions. With them you can stay at Koswak Lodge and spend nights in harmony with nature, always with the best comforts in Amubri, Talamanca. In Koswak Lodge they offer food and lodging service in traditional ranches.

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