Laura Chinchilla (Archive Photo)
Laura Chinchilla (Archive Photo)
The Costa Rica New (TCRN) – “Salute to (our) country at the time with fervor, faith and hope. Let it spread with such fervor, knowing that we are heirs to a unique heritage of democracy, peace, freedom, human development and love of nature. A legacy that not many countries the planet can boast” Laura Chinchilla said in a speech.

The president hosted the official acts of celebration of independence that began in San Jose with the placement of a wreath at the National Monument, which represents the union of the five Central American nations gained independence from Spain.

Then, the president gave a speech at the Central Park of the capital that preceded the start of the parades of bands and students.

Chinchilla reminded that today is the last celebration of independence is attending as president, then hand over power on May 8 to whoever wins in the February elections.

Among the problems she has faced in her government and posed challenges for the next fiscal deficit Chinchilla said (to around 5% of annual GDP), the slowdown in the economy, organized crime, an institutional “archaic” and “a hostile neighbor,” referring to the Government of Nicaragua.

Chinchilla said she managed to strengthen the social and educational investment, create employment opportunities, improve safety, competitiveness, innovation, and contain expenditure growth.

The president said that one of the challenges “pressing” the country is implementing reforms renewing a “tired archaic institutions,” which in her opinion, prevents decisions swiftly.

Referring to Nicaragua, Chinchilla said that “from the north has been… verbal aggression, political and military against Costa Rica” before she said that her country will continue to defend with “legitimate tools”.

Costa Rica and Nicaragua maintained since 2010 a series of border disputes and some of them will be resolved by the International Court of Justice (ICJ), which runs a judgment on it.

Chinchilla ended her speech praising the hero and national liberator Juan Rafael Mora Porras, who is legally held its bicentennial next year.

Mora Porras, president of Costa Rica between 1849 and 1860, led the armed campaign in 1856 that defended the sovereignty and independence of Central America to the U.S. invasion of filibusters led by William Walker. EFE

The Costa Rica New (TCRN)
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