The Solis Administration promises improved treatment for persons suffering from sexually transmitted diseases.

Earlier this month, the Solis Administration issued a statement ensuring “proper comprehensive care for people with sexually transmitted diseases, including Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS).” The announcement — made public on December 4, 2015 — came shortly after the The Ministry of Health signed Guideline 037 on December 1, which happens to be World AIDS Day.

According to the new legislation, centralized and decentralized public healthcare locations must provide the best care possible for STD patients, regardless of their ability to work or pay the voluntary social security fees.

HIV-AIDS in Costa Rica

The goal of Guideline 037, says vice president, Ana Helena Chacon Echeverría is to improve the availability of health services for impoverished nationals and foreigners alike:

[quote_center]“[There is a] need to intensify efforts to narrow the gap between those who have access to prevention services, antiretroviral treatment and medical care.”[/quote_center]

In her mind, the Solis Administration is answering this call by developing public policies that employ action, coordination, prevention and awareness so as to open public spaces and services which are free of stigmas and discrimination and uphold “the broadest respect for human rights.”

As of last year, there were a total of 7,344 reported cases of people living with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) in Costa Rica (HIV is the virus responsible for AIDS). The Costa Rican government claims 738 new cases have been detected during 2015. All in all, the vast majority of those living with HIV are male.

Ongoing Goals

In addition to improved and increased care throughout Costa Rica, the country has also adopted the following goals to be completed by 2020:

  • 90% of all people living with HIV in Costa Rica will be diagnosed.
  • 90% of eligible patients will have access to antiretroviral treatments.
  • 90% of affected people will receive treatment so as to render their HIV infection undetectable.