The Costa Rica News (TCRN)-The Central Pacific area is home to one of the most exotic animals in Costa Rica: the gray crown spider-squirrel monkey. This species can only be found in Costa Rican territory.

These monkeys are endangered because its habitat is fragmented in forest patches, so they find it difficult to travel and interact with other members of their population. This has led them to interact with other species, which in turn has weakened their genetic constitution.

The Organization for the Conservation of the Spider-Squirrel Monkey, located in Aguirre, has implemented an initiative intended to preserve the species. It has been called “Naranjo River Biological Corridor”. The project has installed 25 bridges so that monkeys can move around comfortably in an area of 2700 hectares to ensure their passage in high risk areas of electrocution or accidents. Other activities include environmental education projects that benefit 750 children per year and who get involved in conservation works through school garden centers and reforestation campaigns.

Tey Arce, director of the organization, said: “We have been working hard for 12 years to ease the reproduction of this species, and it is encouraging to see how the population has grown”. She added: “Our main strength lies in working as a true partnership between the public and private sectors and communities. Recently, 55.000 reforested native trees were planted in the Biological Corridor Naranjo River and its surrounding areas. This corridor has been legalized by the Conservation Areas National System (Sinac) to protect biodiversity, watersheds, and community resources”.

The Chamber of Commerce of Aguirre gave them the “Making a Difference” award in 2012. In addition, environmental education projects with schools and high schools have proved a success thanks to the participation of the volunteers.

Several companies sponsor the cause, and the money donated is used in the regeneration of the monkeys´ habitat, environmental education, research and monitoring studies to the species. CR-hoy

The Costa Rica News (TCRN)
San Jose, Costa Rica