As soon as December, residents of Costa Rica will finally have access to a long-acting insulin analog called Tresiba®.

Insulin degludec, brand name Tresiba®, is a new management tool for those with either Type-I and Type-II diabetes. Quick History of Insulin | TCRNIt has already been approved in such countries as the U.S., Mexico and many others in Europe.

While some diabetes patients are able to maintain healthy sugar levels without insulin, Dr. Guillermo González Gálvez of Mexico explains that all too often doctors and patients alike put off the use of insulin longer than necessary or helpful.

Once all other methods have failed — either by patient’s unwillingness to comply or by the disease’s progressive nature — it’s important that doctor’s explore other options. Dr. Sonia Cerdas Pérez of Hospital CIMA quotes that 40% of those with diabetes don’t have a good control of their disease. Furthermore, this statistic becomes increasingly true the longer one has been diagnosed.

Uncomplicating Diabetes

Quick History of Insulin | TCRNOne of the biggest reasons for this worsening control is the way diabetes management seems to continuously get more and more complicated. After many years of battling the chronic disease, many patients find themselves taking multiple pills, supplements and injections on a tough to follow administration schedule.

That’s where Tresiba®, the newest development in the insulin lineage, comes in. Tresiba® is a once-daily new-generation basal insulin analogue, meaning its molecular structure is the same as that which is found in the human body except for a few modifications that have been made to prolong it’s effectiveness in the body. Novo Nordisk, the company who produces Tresiba®, has added a fatty acid to the structure of the insulin allowing it to stay active for up to 42 hours.

According to Drugs.com:

[quote_center]“Tresiba is the first basal insulin to offer people with diabetes the flexibility of injecting their basal insulin at any time of the day.”[/quote_center]

As soon as December, residents of Costa Rica will finally have access to a long-acting insulin analog called Tresiba®. | TCRNFurthermore, by steadily releasing insulin for the body to use throughout the day, blood sugar will be better regulated. Studies have shown that insulin degludec (Tresiba®) significantly lowers risk of overall and nighttime sugar drops when compared to insulin glargine (Lantus®), an older version of a long-acting basal insulin analogue which claimed to stay active for 18-24. Less sugar peaks and valleys means less risk for some of dangerous complications of Diabetes such as blindness or limb loss.

Those who qualify to try Tresiba® will also be pleased to hear of its innovatively tiny needle designed to not only minimize pain but eliminate the sensation of being pricked in its entirety. Take a look for yourself in the picture to the right.

Stay Informed

The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) claims that 80% of Type-II diabetes is preventable. That means 4 out of every 5 people who now have diabetes could have potentially avoided their condition by simply living a healthy lifestyle.

Once diagnosed, these recommendations become crucial necessities. It is a common misunderstanding that diabetic who take insulin can continue to eat however they want because “the insulin will take care of it.” Truth be told, even with insulin, excessive eating and a lack of exercise will dramatically increase the risks of complications.

Dr. Chih Hao Chen Ku, attending at San Jose’s San Juan de Dios Hospital, explains that people must be proactive in eating balanced meals and finding an exercise that fits their abilities. Join a running club, try yoga, or even “just dance around the house.” The kind of exercise one does is not nearly as important as the commitment to doing it regularly.

Finally, the IDF estimates that as many as half of those with Type-II diabetes have yet to be diagnosed. Do you know your risk? Use their Type-II diabetes assessment tool to find out how likely you are to develop the disease and learn what you can do to prevent it.