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    Costa Ricans are Consuming More Wine and Spirits Than Ever Before

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    The Costa Rica News (TCRN) – Costa Ricans are consuming more wined and sparkling drinks each year, which translates into a higher tax revenue for the Treasury.

    It follows from figures provided by the Directorate General of Customs, Ministry of Finance, from the importation of such beverages from 2012 until last January.

    According to report from the Directorate General of Customs, in 2012 they recorded an income of just over 9 million kilos of drinks, of which 8.6 million are made from grapes.

    In 2013, Customs reported an income of nearly 10 million kilos of drinks, of which 9.4 million are wines made from grapes. This represented 6.519 million colones in taxes.

    The main countries where these beverages were purchased are Chile, Argentina, Spain, France and the United States. There are also drinks from more distant destinations such as South Africa.

    Carlos Abreu Lachner, Yamuni Distribution manager, is optimistic about the growth of this sector in the country.

    There are two main explanations: there more education of these drinks, and different trade agreements have reduced tariffs on imports.

    For instance, he cited the case of the Association Agreement with the European Union, which entered into force on October 1, which lowered import tariffs to 14% for champagne.

    This firm has applied this reduction since early February and brands such as Moët & Chandon have lowered their MSRP from $95 to $63.

    This increase in the consumption of wine and sparkling beverages is also reflected in the appearance of cavas and even institutes that specialize in teaching about wine.

    “There is an increased interest from Costa Ricans on the subject of wine. Our enrollment has increased, I would say, by 50%,” said Villalobos Noylin, Academic Director of Culinary Arts at the Polytechnic Institute.

    The Costa Rica News (TCRN)

    San Jose, Costa Rica

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